White Cube Goes to Yale


White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes has traveled from the Carnegie to Yale School of Architecture where it is on view through May 4. I was delighted to discover this banner (below) prominently displayed on the School’s exterior at the intersection of York Street and Chapel Street in downtown New Haven. The banner uses an aerial view by photographer Iwan Baan of a key project in the exhibition: Tadao Ando’s Chichu Art Museum on the Japanese island of Naoshima. Special thanks to Dean Robert Stern for bringing the exhibition from Pittsburgh to Yale and to Brian Butterfield for coordinating its installation in that remarkably different space.

Iyalenaugurated in 1963, the Yale Art + Architecture Building was designed by Paul Rudolph, then Chair of the Architecture department. It is one of the most inspirational yet controversial buildings of that era, with a blunt exterior of bush-hammered concrete and lateral expanses of glass, and with a complex interior containing multiple levels or “trays.” The building was damaged by a mysterious fire in 1969 at the height of political unrest and the simultaneous flickerings of postmodernism. This tough, iconic structure, now known as Paul Rudolph Hall, has recently been elegantly restored and adapted to contemporary code and environmental requirements.

Among the twenty objects from our permanent collection now on view in the Heinz Architectural Center’s anniversary show, 20/20, the perspective below by Rudolph depicts the Yale Art + Architecture Building on its corner site. Inspired by both Frank Lloyd Wright and the Baroque, Rudolph (1918–1997) was a formidable draughtsman. In this ink perspective with cellophane overlays, we see the interplay of robust vertical and horizontal elements. The former contain services, elevators and stairs and physically hold the entire structure in place. The latter house open studios, office “trays”…and the gallery currently hosting White Cube, Green Maze.

yalebuilding
Paul Rudolph, University; “Yale Art and Architecture Building,” New Haven, CT; [exterior perspective], c. 1958–1962, ink on card with cellophane overlays, Purchase: gift of Henry J. and Drue Heinz Foundation