New Hire: Emily Rice


emilyWhat is your official title, and what are some of your general responsibilities?
Exhibition designer. My main responsibility is to work with our curatorial staff to design our exhibitions from concept through execution. I work through drawings, models, and renderings, which have either handmade physical versions or computer-aided digital versions. I work extensively with Hannah Silbert and Jeff Lovett in the exhibitions department to make sure that each exhibition fulfills the goals of the curatorial team and the museum while working within the project’s budget and schedule. I am also tasked with maintaining continuity in the museum’s style and appearance in terms of casework, exhibition layouts, furnishings, lighting, and a thousand other criteria which comprise an exhibition.

What were you doing before joining us at CMOA?
I was working for a company, TAKTL, which manufactures ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) building cladding panels. I was an architectural projects manager, which meant I handled relationships with architects and installers from the initial point of inquiry through to the purchase of the product, providing technical support, pricing, design assistance, etc., along the way. I also looked after the samples program and a small line of UHPC furniture. Before TAKTL, I was special projects assistant at CMOA for White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes, a 2012 exhibition curated by Raymund Ryan in the Heinz Architectural Center. I also worked for a few different architecture firms in Pittsburgh after receiving my B.Arch. from Carnegie Mellon University.

What’s your favorite exhibition that you saw this past year (at any museum/event)?
I had a great day walking through the Mike Kelley retrospective at the PS1 in Queens this fall (see above) which was impressive in its sheer size and variety of experience, let alone the actual installations. Another definite highlight was visiting the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, more so for the amazing architecture than anything else.

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Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Domestic), 2002, cast plaster on various armatures; Owned jointly by Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund and Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; The Henry L. Hillman Fund

If you could steal one artwork from our collection, what would it be?
Rachel Whiteread’s Untitled (Domestic). The piece, a very large negative casting of a staircase, is owned jointly by CMOA and the Albright-Knox Museum, where it is currently on view. Given its enormous size, I think it’s safe to say I won’t be carrying out that plan.

Five things you can’t live without?
Yoga, graph paper, sewing machine, a kitchen, coffee.

Describe Pittsburgh in five words or less.
Watch out for the ravines.

Favorite hobbies? Or any other projects you’d like to share?
I’m a founding board member at Assemble, a small non-profit community arts and technology space on Penn Avenue here in Pittsburgh, and I currently serve as secretary of the board. We’re heavily volunteer-run and we have a working board, so I spend a bit of my free time working to keep the organization running smoothly.